Center Stage- 2018

February 7, 2018

African American Art takes center stage

at the McNay with four epic exhibitions opening in Spring 2018:

 

 

African American Art takes center stage

at the McNay with four epic exhibitions opening in Spring 2018:

Something to Say: The McNay Presents 100 Years of African American Art

30 Americans: Rubell Family Collection

Haiti’s Revolution in Art: Jacob Lawrence’s Toussaint L’Ouverture Series

4 Texans: The Next Chapter

 

San Antonio, TX (February 1, 2018) – The McNay Art Museum is proud to announce four groundbreaking African American art exhibitions opening in Spring 2018. Something to Say: The McNay Presents 100 Years of African American Art; 30 Americans: Rubell Family Collection; and Haiti’s Revolution in Art: Jacob Lawrence’s Toussaint L’Ouverture Series open on February 8 and continue through May 6. 4 Texans: The Next Chapter opens on March 1 and continues through May 6.

 

Something to Say is the first major survey of modern and contemporary African American art to be presented at the McNay. The exhibition juxtaposes works from the pioneering collection of Harmon and Harriet Kelley with loans from the collections of Guillermo Nicolas and Jim Foster, John and Freda Facey, and the McNay.

 

“We are honored to present this extraordinary range of community-building exhibitions concurrently,” said Rich Aste, Director of the McNay. “They exemplify the Museum’s commitment to equity, inclusion, and social consciousness as well as artistic excellence.”

 

Drawn primarily from the Kelleys' groundbreaking collection, Something to Say presents more than 50 artworks by a range of 20th- and 21st-century artists. Featuring masterpieces by such iconic figures as Charles Alston, Elizabeth Catlett, Lois Mailou Jones, Jacob Lawrence, Norman Lewis, and Charles White, the exhibition and related programs allow visitors to reflect on a range of African American experiences, and examine how artists have expressed personal, political, and racial identity over approximately 100 years.

 

Also included in Something to Say is Benny Andrews’ Sexism, the seventh in the McNay’s series of AT&T Lobby installations. Between 1970 and 1975, Benny Andrews created six monumental paintings as part of his Bicentennial series, in response to official United States Bicentennial plans to be carried out in 1976. The McNay presents the fourth work in the series, Sexism, 1973, wherein Andrews, inspired by his involvement with feminist groups and activists, explores similar oppressions of women. The work is humorous, surreal, provocative, and complex in its contemplation of the distribution of power among genders. 

 

Something to Say is organized by René Paul Barilleaux, the McNay’s Head of Curatorial Affairs. Serving as curatorial advisor is Lowery Stokes Sims, former director of the Studio Museum in Harlem. The exhibition is accompanied by an illustrated catalogue featuring two essays by Sims.

 

“We hope that this exhibition, along with 30 Americans, promotes reflection, dialogue and creativity within the larger community,” Barilleaux said. “The range of works is extraordinary and they compel us to think about history, culture, and identity in new ways.”

Something to Say: The McNay Presents 100 Years of African American Art

30 Americans: Rubell Family Collection

Haiti’s Revolution in Art: Jacob Lawrence’s Toussaint L’Ouverture Series

4 Texans: The Next Chapter

 

San Antonio, TX (February 1, 2018) – The McNay Art Museum is proud to announce four groundbreaking African American art exhibitions opening in Spring 2018. Something to Say: The McNay Presents 100 Years of African American Art; 30 Americans: Rubell Family Collection; and Haiti’s Revolution in Art: Jacob Lawrence’s Toussaint L’Ouverture Series open on February 8 and continue through May 6. 4 Texans: The Next Chapter opens on March 1 and continues through May 6.

 

Something to Say is the first major survey of modern and contemporary African American art to be presented at the McNay. The exhibition juxtaposes works from the pioneering collection of Harmon and Harriet Kelley with loans from the collections of Guillermo Nicolas and Jim Foster, John and Freda Facey, and the McNay.

 

“We are honored to present this extraordinary range of community-building exhibitions concurrently,” said Rich Aste, Director of the McNay. “They exemplify the Museum’s commitment to equity, inclusion, and social consciousness as well as artistic excellence.”

 

Drawn primarily from the Kelleys' groundbreaking collection, Something to Say presents more than 50 artworks by a range of 20th- and 21st-century artists. Featuring masterpieces by such iconic figures as Charles Alston, Elizabeth Catlett, Lois Mailou Jones, Jacob Lawrence, Norman Lewis, and Charles White, the exhibition and related programs allow visitors to reflect on a range of African American experiences, and examine how artists have expressed personal, political, and racial identity over approximately 100 years.

 

Also included in Something to Say is Benny Andrews’ Sexism, the seventh in the McNay’s series of AT&T Lobby installations. Between 1970 and 1975, Benny Andrews created six monumental paintings as part of his Bicentennial series, in response to official United States Bicentennial plans to be carried out in 1976. The McNay presents the fourth work in the series, Sexism, 1973, wherein Andrews, inspired by his involvement with feminist groups and activists, explores similar oppressions of women. The work is humorous, surreal, provocative, and complex in its contemplation of the distribution of power among genders. 

 

Something to Say is organized by René Paul Barilleaux, the McNay’s Head of Curatorial Affairs. Serving as curatorial advisor is Lowery Stokes Sims, former director of the Studio Museum in Harlem. The exhibition is accompanied by an illustrated catalogue featuring two essays by Sims.

 

“We hope that this exhibition, along with 30 Americans, promotes reflection, dialogue and creativity within the larger community,” Barilleaux said. “The range of works is extraordinary and they compel us to think about history, culture, and identity in new ways.”

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